Chip Off the Old Block

My children dislike this phrase because it highlights their lineage back to me. Used here, “a chip off the old block” means a person or thing that derives from the source or parentage. It first appears in the English language in or around 1621 when Robert Sanderson, Bishop of Lincoln, giving his sermon said, “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?”

Chips off the Block

Chips off the Block

Should you ask my sons if they are not a chip of the same block with me or their father, I believe they will dash out the door cringing in terror. At this stage in their lives, they strive to be different. That’s okay. I recall reading a parenting book that suggested testing out full ends of a continuum causes children to learn to make better decisions. As long as they are legal and safe, I’m supportive of that continuum testing.

Radishes are part of my family’s food lineage. I recall them growing in my grandparents’ garden and while I’ve never loved them, I’ve always endured them. They’re kind to gardeners because of their quick production. In fact, the name radish derives from the Greek word Raphanus which translates to “quickly appearing”. As long as they’re sliced and buried beneath salad greens, they’re fine.

IMG_0798Radishes are high in vitamin C and a mild anti-inflammatory. There are many varieties including the watermelon radish, introduced to me through my CSA. Watermelon radishes are mild and sweet and I can actually eat them straight up as a snack. Last week on the flight to visit my Grandmother, there was a recipe for radish chips inside the airline magazine. The photo was gorgeous yet I failed to pull it out upon departure.

Watermelon radish

Watermelon radish

I feel like we receive radishes year round and today, my vegetable crisper is packed with them. I’ve attempted a couple of braised radish dishes in the past but found them limp and tasteless. These chips however are low maintenance and the first batch disappeared rapidly. I did this three times varying the cooking times and spice. My best is below:

Roasted Radish Chips
adapted from Simple Comfort Food
Serves 4 or so

Ingredients:

  • Approximately 20 radishes, cleaned and ends trimmed
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • generous pinch of salt
  • pinch of cracked black pepper
  • grated parmesan (optional)

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. (I used a convection oven)

Slice radishes to approximately 1/8 inch thick. Place them in a bowl and add the olive oil and seasonings. Mix well to coat all of the radishes.

Sliced

Sliced

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use a stone baking tray to lay out the radishes. Bake for approximately 15 minutes. Take out and flip and cook for another 15 minutes.

Keep an eye on them and check the texture. You will notice they will begin to shrink in size and crisp up. This is what you want. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with parmesan if desired and plate and serve. In the future I might try using a dehydrator in order to get a more crisp chip.IMG_0783

What family trait or favorite dish from your childhood have you modified for your life today?

Previous Post
Leave a comment

75 Comments

  1. Beth Rabuczewski

     /  January 9, 2013

    Thanks, Tammy. My New Year’s resolution is to try every vegetable in my local market that I don’t normally eat. I was dreading the radishes. Now they are on the top of my list!

    Reply
    • Great resolution Beth! I had a tough time “crisping” these enough so play with it and see what you figure out. That said, they’ve all been eaten.

      Reply
  2. Radishes were the FIRST thing I ever planted . . . because I knew they would mature quickly, not because I liked them much.

    Now, I’m OK with them, but only in small doses.

    Those chips look pretty. I would definitely give them a taste.

    Reply
  3. My mother used to grow radishes and she would pull them from the garden, slice them up and put them in a salad and that is what I’d be given for dinner. I have to say, I’ve never warmed to radishes. I really just don’t like the taste. But I’d like to try them once they’ve been turned into chips – these look really interesting xx

    Reply
  4. Kathy McNamara

     /  January 9, 2013

    My mother made me eat Radishes anytime I started with a stuff or runny nose! She would eat them as she cooked. Love the article as always.

    Reply
  5. I love radishes so I definitely need to try these radish chips. Radishes were one of the crops that succeeded for me last Fall and I’m still harvesting them each time I visit the farm. Lots in my refrig that I need to use, and they come in faster than I can consume them in salads or sliced as snacks.

    I planted black Spanish, white icicle, Misato rose, and China rose. The first two were the fastest to produce and grew the best. Misato rose was next. China rose slower to get going and looks most like the watermelon radish you showed in one pic. But that might be due to frequent heavy rains and cold, damp weather we’ve had for the 2 months (and heavy rains all fall, not just recently).

    Thanks for sharing the recipe! I look forward to trying it.

    Reply
    • I thought the black ones were really odd. One reader commented about putting them in slaw and I think that will work for me – not too much radish but some spice.

      Reply
      • Update to say I have the black Spanish radishes roasting in the oven right now, trying to crisp. Also, the radish I planted that looks like the watermelon radish is the Misato rose. The China rose never really got going, but I haven’t given up hope.

        Reply
  6. My old CSA, Blenheim Organic Gardens, put a recipe up on the Washington Post website for eggplant chips, using a similar method. I used to ‘endure’ (love that!) radishes and give the extra to my dad, but I now love the simple radish sandwich just like he does. However, I get more radishes from my current CSA than I can eat in sandwich format. I’ve bookmarked this recipe for the spring radish onslaught. Thank you!

    Reply
    • You know, I marinated eggplant slices and put them in the dehydrator a couple of years ago to make vegan “bacon”. It was ok – actually a decent snack but nothing that we craved.

      Reply
  7. PS: My turn to have a problem leaving a comment. WordPress.com login to post comment was the issue (it says it’s there, but I couldn’t see it). I was able to post comment via Twitter login. Apologies if you have a duplicate comment from me.

    Reply
  8. Yum! These look delicious!

    Reply
  9. I love how beautiful the varieties are! Maybe I’ll make my way from Kale chips to radish chips :)

    Reply
    • We do need something to take the place of kale chips. They’ve been center stage for a while.

      Reply
  10. Radishes rock! I really enjoy the crunch of daikons diced up in all kinds of stuff, and like you said can happily snack on the familiar red ones.

    I’ve done tons of stuff in the dehydrator but hadn’t thought to do radishes. Good idea! One thing to note: as things dry the flavor consolidates and intensifies. It would be a good idea to start with a mild variety, or at least one that you’re really fond of!

    As for modifying childhood favorites, almost everything goes in that category. My family ate a lot of vegetables but cooked them until they were soggy, then drowned them in fat or dairy. Any health benefits and virtually all the original flavor was eliminated. Since then I’ve eliminated meat and dairy and reduced the amount of cooking time for vegetables, so they taste better and they’re better for us too. Helps that it’s a cost-savings too! My southern belle grandmother loved to cook and would likely be aghast at what our family eats these days, but happily people (and their eating habits) continue to evolve.

    Reply
  11. Aren’t those watermelon radishes beautiful?! I made an app with them once with chickpeas!

    I never thought about roasting radishes before… hmm…

    Reply
  12. Interesting idea for radishes. I’ve only ever eaten them raw. My brother in law loves them and I usually give him one or more of the bunches from my CSA. Now he’ll have to compete with this recipe ;-)

    Reply
  13. I love radishes. Dave doesn’t but I will sneak these into his veggie chips :)

    Reply
  14. Now that is first for me, but one thing I am for
    sure going to try!

    Thank you!

    Linda

    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

    http://deltacountyhistoricalsociety.wordpress.com

    Reply
  15. Sally

     /  January 10, 2013

    Great! Radish sandwiches, open faced on fresh french bread and sweet butter a french favorite. But radishes do much more for the metabolisim and helps to burn fat, so……….
    They are delish marinated in seasoned rice vinegar and a little toasted sesame oil.
    I hated rutabega root veggies as a child but adore them now, roasted with fennel and herbs and served with a protien on top. I favor halibut for this. I recently had this in Seattle with just the fennel and an arugala pesto on top of the halibut. A new favorite!

    Reply
    • I think you’re at least the second person who said radish sammies so I will have to give it a go.

      Reply
  16. I love radishes—the fresher the better. I’m with Sally; fresh bread, sweet butter and radish slices is a divine combination. But just popping them in my mouth is lovely, too.

    Reply
  17. Well… we’ve recently revived the ol’ Liver and Onions theme in our house. It’s a much nicer version of the old classic, but frankly, it’s still liver, and eaten under great protest. However, every time we have it, their resistance fades just a tiny shade, and I hope one day they’ll be lecturing their own kids about the endless nutritional benefits of beef liver. Or banning it from their kitchen forever for the witch’s spell component it resembles. Either way, they’ll be testing out the full continuum, right?

    Reply
    • Yes on the continuum but no way on the liver. I remember my parents doing that to me and I’ll never go there. I could open the front door and smell it and know that I was doomed for dinner.

      Reply
  18. I love radishes, but only when the texture is fine and crisp. Radish sprouts are my favorite. Your chips look awesome, and you have to try making radish butter. It’s my favorite way to do radishes…

    My family dinner redo is tuna noodle casserole. My family calls it tunie noonie but made it with cream of celery soup and other processed stuff. Recently I redid it using a made from scratch white sauce and I loved it. Really creamy, warm and comforting… and a flashback.

    Reply
  19. Watermelon radishes are so gorgeous! Call me crazy, but I’ve never done anything but eat radishes raw. It’s probably high time I gave something like this a try!

    Reply
  20. I didn’t know there were so many kinds! I kind of like radishes and it’s one of the few veggies my hubby will eat, just raw. Now I have another way to fix them! Thank you!
    I can’t think of anything from my childhood that I modified to eat yet today. I just know that I eat more than I did as a kid. I was a picky eater .. . .and skinny. haha!

    Reply
  21. I love radishes and love the idea of chips made from them. Thanks Tammy.

    Reply
  22. I am a big fan of radishes & sow them each year! :) What a great & very appetizing idea! I love the Parmesan cheese over the tops too! :) Fun & tasty finger food!

    Reply
  23. I absolutely adore watermelon radishes – they are so pretty and so delicious – much easier than your plain, piquant red radishes that we are all used to… These chips are a great idea – I usually use my excess radish stock in some type of slaw. Hidden with other winter veggies they provide the right amount of crunch and a hint of spice (but don’t dominate)… Thanks for commenting on my blog – I’m looking forward to reading more about your veggies and blog adventures!

    Reply
  24. What a great, friendly way to use radishes! I think crispy chips makes even the most detestable vegetables palatable to children…or adults!

    Reply
  25. lucewriter

     /  January 12, 2013

    Oh yum! I’m printing this. I had forgotten about cooking radishes and how much I love them!

    Reply
    • We definitely enjoyed them this way. I’ve not had the best success cooking them despite so many people telling me how great they are.

      Reply
  26. Can it be? Something crispy and healthy that you can snack on? I have never heard of a dehydrator before, though. Sounds like it’s worth the investment.

    Reply
  27. I am always looking for ways to use up my CSA radishes; we just can’t eat that many in salads and radish sandwiches do not entice me. Chips are a great idea that maybe the kids would even try. Thanks!

    Reply
  28. sk

     /  January 14, 2013

    This is awesome! Now I know what I am going to do with MY leftover radishes!

    Reply
  29. Mmm, these looks delicious. I have not tasted a radish dish before and I’m curious to try it. As for chip off the old block, my son likes some of the Asian food me and his mom eats but he is creating a taste of his own. His favorite is maccoroni and cheese which is not my pasta of choice.

    Reply
    • Can’t believe you haven’t had a radish! Your son will inevitably like many of the things later on when his taste buds are more developed.

      Reply
  30. First of all…LOVE the new banner and logo :) Very hip!

    Secondly…radish chips? You are my new hero. And..I just got a mandolin. So guess I know where my next round of radishes are going…

    Thanks for sharing :)

    Reply
  31. Hm, I’m thinking about a German equivalent of this expression … I don’t know if there is one that exactly captures this meaning. You can say “vom selben Schlag” what means “from the same batch”. But that doesn’t necessarily imply lineage. Hm, hm.

    Anyway, I’ve certainly neglected radishes in cooking! Literally, because I’ve eaten radishes mostly cold so far, finely sliced in a salad, or gnawing on the little pink ones just like that. This dish looks so nice! I also love how you combined different kinds of radishes. :)

    Reply
  32. They were good although very thinly sliced, I can tolerate them well.

    Reply
  33. I am swimming in radishes at the moment…not literally, because that would be weird.
    Great recipe, and I can’t wait to try them. Thank you.

    Reply
  34. I love radishes, a real delight with crispy bread and a little butter. I love them too because they mean Spring. Which is far from being here at the moment. Thanks for the recipe, Tammy.

    Reply
    • You are the third or fourth person to talk about the butter and radish sandwiches, I must try them soon.

      Reply
  35. I love radishes. They are a quick explosion in the mouth. I can eat a whole bag without worrying that I’m eating too many calories. Thanks for posting! Now I’m in the mood for some radishes, maybe in one of those butter and radish sandwiches people have been posting about. And of course your radish chips! I never thought of cheese on radishes, but it sounds delicious!

    Reply
  36. I’ve only ever slivered radishes onto salads, I’ll have to try these! They look great!

    Reply
    • My husband loved these. They went fast but they were not “crispy”.

      Reply
      • I wonder if salting them and letting them sit for a bit prior to cooking like you do with eggplant or zucchini would draw out more moisture and allow them to crisp. I’ll give that a try when I do this recipe and let you know how it goes!

        Reply
  1. What’s in the Box? #58 | In Her Chucks
  2. Week In Review: The Weekend List Edition | Clean Eats, Fast Feets
  3. Incredibly Tasty Radish Recipes A La Bandit | The Bandit Ranch
  4. At least this Bowl was Super | Agrigirl's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: