The Great Apostle of Charity

He is honored with a feast on the 27th day of September in the U.K., in France and in the U.S.. Born to peasant parents in the Kingdom of France, the family resided near the Paul river and it is believed that their surname was derived from there. Noteworthy however, young Vincent wrote his last name as Depaul to avoid any inference that he was of nobility.

Humility in the Garden

Humility in the Garden

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Creative Crowdfunding Models

Community Supported Agriculture, a method by which individuals prepay for a share of a farmer’s produce, has been around in the U.S. since the 1980s. It was based on the Japanese concept of teikei translated literally as putting a face on one’s food. CSA enables farmers to sell directly to consumers, ensures a certain level of food safety by allowing individuals to see and in some cases work at a farm and creates a mutually beneficial relationship where food dollars stay local and food miles are reduced. As most of you know, I could go on.

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Weekend Reading – The Hungry Ear and More

A Good Read:

The Hungry Ear
Poems of Food & Drink
Edited by Kevin Young

Unknown

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Shell Game

They call it a shell game
But my Uncle Jack told me it was called Thimblerig.

Take out three shells and a pea – an old soldier’s trick.
It’s depicted as a gamble, but really, when the wager’s for money, it’s a confidence trick
used to perpetrate fraud.

flickr.com/photos/anchovypizza/ CC2.0

flickr.com/photos/anchovypizza/ CC2.0

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Ode to My Grocer

Eddie Basha 1937 - 2013

Eddie Basha
1937 – 2013
A Good Man and a Very Bad Boy

Two years ago, my dear friend and mentor, Eddie Basha, died just before national poetry month. I couldn’t finish this at the time but wanted to honor him. He was an Arizona Icon and a brilliant business man with a heart bigger than his head. He had a generosity of spirit and a flare for practical jokes like no one I’ll ever know. He ran for Governor once but lost because although he was a great leader, he was a poor politician. His grocery chain, Bashas, is dispersed widely across our state and is a hub in many of our rural communities. He spent many years on the Board of Regents, a warrior for education for all. I remain deeply saddened by his departure yet in his leaving, he has caused me and others to examine our words and deeds through the filter of fairness and kindness. I wrote this from my own observations and also from some of the lovely tributes paid to him in the days following his death.

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The Pollen Path

Oh, Beauty before me, Beauty behind me, Beauty to the right of me, Beauty to the left of me,  Beauty above me,  Beauty below me. I’m on the pollen path.

Navajo poem

IMG00163-20110327-1336-1

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Conquering Cold Season

I said the words too quickly and too confidently, “I haven’t had a cold in years.” Thinking back, it may have been six or seven years ago and then, after a weekend that allowed too little sleep, I woke with an angry scratch in the back of my throat. I don’t want to be sick, don’t have time to be sick and frankly am a bit peeved about it. I know that my immune system is diminished without ample sleep and here I am.

Spoiled by the Abundance of Citrus

Spoiled by the Abundance of Citrus

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Putting the Super in Bowl

Locally, we’re still in a bit of post-game Euphoria. We had scores of visitors from the Northern states places escaping the brutal grasp of winter cold while energetically supporting their home teams. Sea planes full of CEOs were flying overhead to scope available land and probably the abundance of golf. Downtown workers used more profanity during their commutes as they battled the detours.

Putting the Super in Bowl

Putting the Super in Bowl

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The Pull of Polenta

This is the most glorious time in the Valley of the Sun. We’ve tunneled through desert frost into celebrated golf temps that teeter on the verge of spring training. The acacia are blooming with a Sonoran strangeness that is both tropical and sweet and carries into the cooler night time air. And the fair weather winterers are donning the final days of boots and vests pretending that we are still at least somewhat attached to winter.

The Pull of Polenta

The Pull of Polenta

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Why did the Democrat cross the aisle?

Tammy:

Five years ago, my friend and mentor Sue Clark-Johnson arranged for me to have a really special day. This week, Sue died far too young and far too quickly. As my friend Richard Morrison said, “Among many other accomplishments, she was a former Publisher of the Arizona Republic newspaper and the immediate past Director of the Morrison Institute of Public Policy. She worked tirelessly for Arizona. This is a sad day. While she was of a diminutive stature, she was a giant among us.” God bless you Sue.

Originally posted on Agrigirl's Blog:

To eat the chalupa!

Let me explain. One of the highlights of my year was the opening of the O’Connor House. The 1950’s adobe ranch-style home was moved brick by brick to its new location behind the historical museum in Papago Park. I’d been invited by a special mentor to have lunch but had no idea that the home’s previous owner, former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, would be in attendance. Nor did I know that it would be the first time Justice O’Connor had seen the home since it was moved. And finally, imagine my delight in being seated next to her for the meal.

Sandra Day O’Connor and the O’Connor House

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