While I Groak

How does a word become obsolete? Is it simply that dialects morph over time or do we drop a word in favor of others that roll from the tongue with more grace? I recall a story on NPR when “slacks” was being voted out of the language. I must admit that I wouldn’t be sad to see it go. Pants, trousers, jeans, khakis, capris all hit the mark with greater specificity or at least a more amenable sound. Slacks clamors for attention like an ugly tattoo on an aging beer belly.

 

I groak!

I groak!

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The Bliss Bite

I thrive on data. I love to sift through statistics and and qualitative research piecing together unrelated fact streams and digging deeply into areas of intrigue. I like to read research projects and report back.  This fascination fuels my day job where I’m able to dig into customer research and opinion trends and create or modify programs to meet changing demands.

flickr.com 2.0 Michael Kreil

flickr.com 2.0 Michael Kreil

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Local Food Focus – Hopi Blue Corn

The Blue Corn Maiden

A Hopi Legend


The Blue Corn Maiden is said to be the most beautiful of the corn maiden sisters. The people  loved her very much and they loved the blue corn that she brought to them all year long. Because of this, they felt peace and happiness when she was amongst them.

Hopi Blue Corn

Hopi Blue Corn

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Starving to Death: the “luck” of the Irish

Tammy:

Happy St. Patrick’s Day. This morning Jackie of the Auburn Meadow Farm posted regarding the event that many of us know as the Potato Famine. I find it fascinating but also chilling to learn about the reliance on mono-crops and the influence of wealthy industry in that great tragedy. Can we learn from this?

Originally posted on Auburn Meadow Farm:

“The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the Famine.”

— Irish national activist, solicitor & political journalist, John Mitchel

250px-John_Mitchel_(Young_Ireland)

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My family came to America from Ireland in the early 1900’s so you’d think I’d have some firsthand tales to tell about the Great Hunger. But, alas, my family is not a sharer of stories, photos or heirlooms handed down from one generation to the next.

They say history is written by the victors, and mylack of understanding of the Irish Potato Famine proves this true.  This day every year when all Americans are honorary Irishmen is a perfect time to reflect on the actual history of the most influential Irish event I know.

Of course what we call the Irish Potato Famine, the Irish instead call the Great Starvation. The Irish rejection of the term Famine is very specific; a famine is a natural disaster. And…

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Weekend Reading – Forks Over Knives Companion

A Good Read:

Forks Over Knives
The How-To Companion
Edited by Gene Stone

Forks Over Knives

Forks Over Knives

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Feeling Presidential

There was a time when my oldest son knew every last detail about the U.S. Presidents. He was 6 years old and knowing this trivia was his passion; their pets, their kids, their hobbies, the shortest in stature, the heaviest, the assassinated, the bachelor.

President's Day

President’s Day

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Weekend Reading – A Homemade Life and More

A Good Read:

A Homemade Life
Stories from My Kitchen Table
by Molly Wizenberg

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Weekend Reading – Eating Between the Lines and More

A Good Read:

Eating Between the Lines
The Supermarket Shopper’s Guide to the Truth Behind Food Labels
by Kimberly Lord Stewart

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Community Supported Agriculture as a Change Agent

Tammy:

Think Community Supported Agriculture is just about getting healthy organic food on your dinner table? Think again. As this wonderfully informative post from GoodGreekStuff indicates, food is political. What we eat is reflective of our social, health and environmental choices. In the Gine Agrotis platform, CSAs are seen as one method of creating stability under austere conditions.

Originally posted on Good Greek Stuff:

As Greeks struggle to adapt to a protracted period of harsh austerity, new initiatives have emerged that break with existing economic and social practices and offer new models of organizing the way we provide for and take care of our selves. One of the most interesting of these initiatives comes from the tradition of community-shared agriculture (CSA), in which individuals pre-book a share of the weekly harvest of small farmers. Although CSA’s have existed in Japan, North America and Western Europe for decades, Gine Agrotis (Become a Farmer!), which began operating in Greece in March 2012,  is something  new for Greece.

Home page of the (Gine Agrotis) “Become a Farmer” website

The idea behind Gine Agrotis is relatively simple. Register with the platform and book a field on one of the certified organic farms that belong to the service’s network. You decide how much land to reserve; there are two-…

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Weekend Reading – Deeply Rooted and More

A Good Read:

Deeply Rooted
Unconventional Farmers in the Age of Agribusiness
by Lisa Hamilton

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