Is Your Favorite Vegetable in the Dirty Dozen™?

Another blogging friend to the rescue and I delve into one of my eleven texts required for the CEcD exam. Thank you Inger!

A decade ago, the non-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG) unveiled its first Shoppers Guide™ to Pesticides in Produce. The revolutionary list ranked pesticide residues in common fruits and vegetables, forever changing grocery shopping for pesticide-wary consumers. Now updated annually, the new 2014 list was unveiled last week.

The EWG list provides a ranking of 48 common fruits and vegetables based on volume and variety of pesticide residue. Apples came out the worst — especially concerning if you consider the quantities of apples and apple juice consumed by children–and avocados were rated the best. The worst 12 items on the list are dubbed the “Dirty Dozen™” and the best 15 are designated the “Clean Fifteen™.”

from the EWG website

from the EWG website

 

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Top Ten Tips for Emergency Food Preparedness

We’ve all seen the photos of empty grocery store shelves raided by paranoia and self-preservation when an impending doom is near. What about those who aren’t able to get to a store after doom has hit? Cyclones, ice storms, earthquakes, heat waves or disasters of the human kind like the chemical spill that poisoned a West Virginia water supply are seeming to occur with more regularity than I remember in the past.

After the 3/11 earthquake (flickrcc2.0-jacejudith)

After the 3/11 earthquake (flickrcc2.0-jacejudith)

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Overcoming the Ick Factor

My husband and I were deep in the golden triangle of Thailand. We had been hiking for most of the day. It was hot and we were sweaty. And with growling intestines, we were eagerly awaiting a meal of very authentic Thai food.

The Governor

The Governor

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Bulking Up

Hunger is an incredibly complex issue. This is at the forefront of my thinking as we are currently in the annual SNAP challenge. My family and I are not participating this year as we have in the past. With the intense adolescent caloric intake happening in my home, I do not have the capacity for planning the appropriate protein density on $22.50 a day. Doesn’t that statement on it’s own speak to the complexity of hunger?

flickr.com/photos/lacatholique/cc2.0

flickr.com/photos/lacatholique/cc2.0

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The Bliss Bite

I thrive on data. I love to sift through statistics and and qualitative research piecing together unrelated fact streams and digging deeply into areas of intrigue. I like to read research projects and report back.  This fascination fuels my day job where I’m able to dig into customer research and opinion trends and create or modify programs to meet changing demands.

flickr.com 2.0 Michael Kreil

flickr.com 2.0 Michael Kreil

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If the Label Fits

It’s purely coincidence that Argylesock and I were having a dialogue about GMO labeling just last week. Then, last Monday, Connecticut, a blue state with the highest per capita income in the U.S., became the first to require food manufacturers to label products that contain GMOs. Well, they almost did. IMG_1008

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Happy Day Mrs. Jarvis!

She was specific about the punctuation. It should be singular possessive so that each family can honor their own mother. That very statement implied that it would not be a plural possessive commemorating all women in the world. And so, U.S. President Wilson used the singular possessive when he signed the law creating the official Mother’s Day holiday in 1914.IMG_0970

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Starving to Death: the “luck” of the Irish

Tammy:

Happy St. Patrick’s Day. This morning Jackie of the Auburn Meadow Farm posted regarding the event that many of us know as the Potato Famine. I find it fascinating but also chilling to learn about the reliance on mono-crops and the influence of wealthy industry in that great tragedy. Can we learn from this?

Originally posted on Auburn Meadow Farm:

“The Almighty, indeed, sent the potato blight, but the English created the Famine.”

— Irish national activist, solicitor & political journalist, John Mitchel

250px-John_Mitchel_(Young_Ireland)

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My family came to America from Ireland in the early 1900′s so you’d think I’d have some firsthand tales to tell about the Great Hunger. But, alas, my family is not a sharer of stories, photos or heirlooms handed down from one generation to the next.

They say history is written by the victors, and mylack of understanding of the Irish Potato Famine proves this true.  This day every year when all Americans are honorary Irishmen is a perfect time to reflect on the actual history of the most influential Irish event I know.

Of course what we call the Irish Potato Famine, the Irish instead call the Great Starvation. The Irish rejection of the term Famine is very specific; a famine is a natural disaster. And…

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Weekend Reading – Forks Over Knives Companion

A Good Read:

Forks Over Knives
The How-To Companion
Edited by Gene Stone

Forks Over Knives

Forks Over Knives

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Molecular Gastronomy

It can be described as the intersection of chemistry and the appetite. Last week our local science museum created a special Science Salon to highlight cooking as alchemy. I’ll admit straight up that as a slow foodist, I was skeptical however, the journey that Josh Hebert, Chef and Owner of POSH “Improvisational Cuisine” was remarkable.

Dessert - Not Salmon Roe

Dessert – Not Salmon Roe

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