Weekend Reading – Plants

A Good Read:

PLANTS
Why you can’t live without them
by B.C. Wolverton and Kozaburo Takenaka

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Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Ways to Celebrate Poetry

A couple of weeks ago, I was invited to a food and wine pairing meal. It was an exquisitely prepared 5 or 6 courses each with a special tasting of wine to accompany. As we head into April, I’d like to acknowledge another type of pairing – that of food and poetry.

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Cortney Davis, the poetry editor of “Alimentum: The Literature of Food,” also acknowledges this pairing.

The best foods are layered–we notice the hint of rosemary behind the muscular taste of tomato or the suggestion of oak that appears moments after the swallow of a fine wine. . . . Some foods taste better left-over–the second-day helping of turkey and stuffing at Thanksgiving. Poems must be multi-layered too, and they must last not only through the second serving, but through many readings, offering us . . . another revelation, another way of looking at ourselves. . . .

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Weekend Reading – Forks Over Knives Companion

A Good Read:

Forks Over Knives
The How-To Companion
Edited by Gene Stone

Forks Over Knives

Forks Over Knives

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Weekend Reading – A Homemade Life and More

A Good Read:

A Homemade Life
Stories from My Kitchen Table
by Molly Wizenberg

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Weekend Reading – Eating Between the Lines and More

A Good Read:

Eating Between the Lines
The Supermarket Shopper’s Guide to the Truth Behind Food Labels
by Kimberly Lord Stewart

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Weekend Reading – Deeply Rooted and More

A Good Read:

Deeply Rooted
Unconventional Farmers in the Age of Agribusiness
by Lisa Hamilton

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Preparing with a Poem in my Pocket

The idea is simple. Find a poem that you love or one that makes you laugh or something that conjures up wistful memories. Write it down. Put it in your pocket and throughout the day, share it with your friends and your coworkers and the people in line at the coffee shop and the students in your class and your family at the dinner table and whoever else you come into contact with. It’s National Poetry Month. Read poetry.

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Writing Down the Bones – or the Butt

You already know that Natalie Goldberg’s Writing Down the Bones is a favorite book of mine. In it she speaks of filling spiral binders with her words consistently – one notebook per month. She writes that her efforts to get her thoughts on to paper actually translate to greater mental health for herself. I began blogging as a way to get myself to write more consistently and while it has done that, I also find myself spending an inordinate amount of time reading other blogs, commenting and analyzing traffic stats.

Sushi Ina's food journal

My friend Preston, a personal trainer, recently suggested that I begin writing something else down on a consistent basis. He recommends that I start keeping a food journal. All I have to do is write down what I eat all day long and add a few other ancillary comments about how I’m feeling after each meal or snack. That’s simple enough since I’m a healthy eater and of course I’m easily drawn in because it sets up a structured framework for me to operate within. (more…)

Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Ideas for Poetry to Enjoy

As another tribute to National Poetry month, I’m offering up ideas of places to start in order to “taste” poetry. I hope you’re moved to grab one  and give it a try. And in full disclosure, let me admit to pirating a few choices from the lovely list compiled by Nancy Pearl and given out in her interview with NPR earlier this week.

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Dinner and a Poem

We were gathered around a large table for the neighborhood potluck. My husband and I are fortunate to live in a community where this is not a rare occurence. On this particular eve, we were celebrating a marriage.  At some point during the meal, our neighbor J stood up and announced, “I’ve got a poem.” And he read that poem from his tall wiry Elvis Costello like frame with animation and emotion. I was sort of embarrassed, a bit amused and definitely intrigued. Days later I followed up with his wife, “Does he read poetry often?” “Oh yes,” she sighed “and he’s serious so I have to stop and listen. There was the time at our daughter’s 16th birthday…” her eyes roll to the back of her head and she relives the teenage embarrassment of the girls gathered for that event.

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