Shell Game

They call it a shell game
But my Uncle Jack told me it was called Thimblerig.

Take out three shells and a pea – an old soldier’s trick.
It’s depicted as a gamble, but really, when the wager’s for money, it’s a confidence trick
used to perpetrate fraud.

flickr.com/photos/anchovypizza/ CC2.0

flickr.com/photos/anchovypizza/ CC2.0

In slang, confident slang I might add, the swindle is referred to as a short-con because it’s quick and easy to pull off.

Place three shells on the table and before a word is said, mystery has run away. Is it gambling? Is it a con? or simply a sleight-of-hand?

In reality, the shells weren’t from the sea. They were walnut shells.
Nor is the poet a scholar. Rather she is from industry, skilled not in the way of words but the way of commerce.

It could be said that with practice, walnut shells become as good as the real thing.

It’s National Poetry Month. Read and write poetry.

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15 Comments

  1. Yay Tammy! 🙂

    Reply
  2. Poetry should be read all the time 🙂

    Reply
  3. Great photo!

    Reply
    • I also like it. It’s from flicker creative commons – someone who is set up as anchovy pizza.

      Reply
  4. That’s a good photo of the walnut shells. I’ve always avoided those sorts of tricks/cons xx

    Reply
    • Unfortunately, it is not my own but I’m happy that the photographer put it on creative commons.

      Reply
  5. HI Tammy, I have always enjoyed your observance of Poetry Month. Thanks again! Nancy

    Reply
  6. Nice analogy. And thanks for the tip (in the comments) about the Flickr Creative Commons photos–I am looking for a fuchsia picture now…

    Reply
  7. A great cool post, thanks, Tammy! 🙂

    Reply
    • You are welcome Sophie. Now what would you make with Walnuts?

      Reply
      • My mom & dad have a large walnut tree & every year, I have to challenge myself. My husband has made a walnut gin, I love a roasted walnut crumble on roasted veggies & a walnut tart etc!

        Reply

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