Molecular Gastronomy

It can be described as the intersection of chemistry and the appetite. Last week our local science museum created a special Science Salon to highlight cooking as alchemy. I’ll admit straight up that as a slow foodist, I was skeptical however, the journey that Josh Hebert, Chef and Owner of POSH “Improvisational Cuisine” was remarkable.

Dessert - Not Salmon Roe

Dessert – Not Salmon Roe

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Hen Keepers

Three percent of U.S. homes have a chicken coop in the yard. Of course, I don’t know how many homes have yards but those with egg-laying birds are on the increase. Is this fad or economics?

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Badlands Weekend

Tucked away in isolation without a local grocery, refuse pick-up or wifi, one becomes immediately aware of consumption. This was the case when we visited the Malpai. The Malpai are the border lands between Arizona, New Mexico and Mexico. Translated, it is bad country named in a history before this according to the heat, the dryness, and the abundant wildlife. Here at the J& A Cattle Ranch we don’t see but know there are an abundance of mountain lion and bear, birds of prey and reptiles. This is wide open space homesteaded under Woodrow Wilson where you wake with the sun and spend time just spending time.

Back of the J&A Ranch

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Community Supported Agriculture as a Change Agent

Think Community Supported Agriculture is just about getting healthy organic food on your dinner table? Think again. As this wonderfully informative post from GoodGreekStuff indicates, food is political. What we eat is reflective of our social, health and environmental choices. In the Gine Agrotis platform, CSAs are seen as one method of creating stability under austere conditions.

Good Greek Stuff

As Greeks struggle to adapt to a protracted period of harsh austerity, new initiatives have emerged that break with existing economic and social practices and offer new models of organizing the way we provide for and take care of our selves. One of the most interesting of these initiatives comes from the tradition of community-shared agriculture (CSA), in which individuals pre-book a share of the weekly harvest of small farmers. Although CSA’s have existed in Japan, North America and Western Europe for decades, Gine Agrotis (Become a Farmer!), which began operating in Greece in March 2012,  is something  new for Greece.

The idea behind Gine Agrotis is relatively simple. Register with the platform and book a field on one of the certified organic farms that belong to the service’s network. You decide how much land to reserve; there are two-, three- and four-person packages available, at a cost ranging from…

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Light at Longwood

“My aim is to express, through the medium of ‘light’, simple fleeting moments of clarity, experiences of connection with the world.”

Bruce Munro

Installation Art of Bruce Munro

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Pay Back

I swear. The hardest thing I’ve ever done is try to be a good parent. There’s no book and I probably wouldn’t have read it if there was. I began with great ideals and have flexed into a more adaptive role realizing that kids and situations vary and that some of my ideals would  have likely put them on a therapist’s couch for years to come. I pray a lot.

Sixteen Year-old Decision

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Independents Week

Sure. You’re thinking I can’t spell and perhaps that does happen on occasion but not today. This 4th of July week is not only symbolic of our nation’s freedom but it’s a time for all Americans to celebrate the importance of our economic democracy by honoring the locally owned independent businesses.

My Mantra

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Paleo Politics and Free Speech

I’ve been contemplating the idea of sending out a weekly post with links to articles of interest. Specifically, I’ve been watching the US farm bill, some emerging issues in African agricultural microfinance and then this: Can the government throw you in jail for offering advice on the Internet about what food people should buy at the grocery store? Seriously?

Dashing off to get a Turkey Leg

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Bitter

Dictionary.com defines it as one of the four basic taste sensations. It is not sour, not sweet and not salty. It is a harsh, disagreeably acrid taste like that of aspirin or wormwood. I’ve never tasted wormword. Today I’m using the word after receiving news that is hard to bear, grievous, distressful; a bitter sorrow.

Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Tips for Less Food Waste

It’s not a problem in my home with three growing boys but when it does happen, it’s typically around food items like a tub of sour cream – purchased as an ingredient for one recipe yet afterwards, left to develop green scum in the back of my fridge. But, here’s the deal: This is a real problem and while I could already surmise that the U.S. would top the wasteful list, it’s a global issue.

Heading to the Compost Pile

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