Late Night Frivolity

Last March I wrote about the delicious evening meals enjoyed on our annual ski trip and the fellowship that endures around the table. This tradition also includes a post-dinner game night. Over the years, we’ve engaged in scavenger hunts, intense Pictionary matches, unforgettable charades and high-tech Olympics.

Red Team responding to Quiz Show

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Beans, Books and Blogging

I’m cheering for Auburn in the BCS Bowl. Auburn is in Alabama – a state I’ve never visited. I don’t even like football much but I do read a mind-stretching blog by Professor Jose Llanes, of the Education Department there and hence, I now find some affinity with this Southern school.

flickr.com/photos/lulieboo - Go Tigers!

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Louisiana Purchase?

My skin started to prickle as I drove into the underpass. Of course I was secure in my car even if it was dark and I was in a new neighborhood but, I was still thinking of my evening conversation. That guy on the bridge was there for seven days.

 

flickr.creativecommons/photos/shawnzlea

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Telling Our Stories

“When a community loses its memory, its members no longer know one another. How can they know one another if they have forgotten or never learned one another’s stories? If they do not know one another’s stories, how can they know whether or not to trust one another? People who do not trust one another do not help one another, and moreover, they fear one another.” (Wendell Berry, What Are People For)

 

Wendell Berry: Farmer, Writer, Academic - photo courtesy of thebridgepai.com

 

 

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Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Ideas for Poetry to Enjoy

As another tribute to National Poetry month, I’m offering up ideas of places to start in order to “taste” poetry. I hope you’re moved to grab one  and give it a try. And in full disclosure, let me admit to pirating a few choices from the lovely list compiled by Nancy Pearl and given out in her interview with NPR earlier this week.

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Dinner and a Poem

We were gathered around a large table for the neighborhood potluck. My husband and I are fortunate to live in a community where this is not a rare occurence. On this particular eve, we were celebrating a marriage.  At some point during the meal, our neighbor J stood up and announced, “I’ve got a poem.” And he read that poem from his tall wiry Elvis Costello like frame with animation and emotion. I was sort of embarrassed, a bit amused and definitely intrigued. Days later I followed up with his wife, “Does he read poetry often?” “Oh yes,” she sighed “and he’s serious so I have to stop and listen. There was the time at our daughter’s 16th birthday…” her eyes roll to the back of her head and she relives the teenage embarrassment of the girls gathered for that event.

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Snowy with a Chance of Kohlrabi

I count myself among the incredibly fortunate who are wealthy in friendships. For the past 19 years, I’ve met up with 11 amazing school friends together with their families for an annual ski trip. One year, there were more than 40 of us! This year, we total 25. We’ve explored many of the great ski resorts in the Western U.S. yet we often return to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. In Steamboat we always rent the same house which makes it tradition for all 24 kids that have been born to us during this time frame – ages ranging from 1 to 19.

Steamboat 2010 - Great Friends

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Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Things to do with a Few Extra Minutes

My conference call ended 5 minutes early.  A neighbor called to say that she’ll pick my son up from baseball practice.  The casserole is in the oven a bit earlier than I’d planned.  Each one of these situations has freed me for the next few minutes – I have precious unexpected downtime.  From my earlier post this week, my son’s prioirty list caused me to think about visible reminders. Granted some of it is in the giddyness of realizing that I’m finally getting through to him!  But what do we do and how do we prioritize when we find an unanticipated few minutes?  Here’s my short list that you can modify, add to, or delete.

 

 

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Tammy’s Top Ten (t3 report) Books on Food and the Food Industry

Some of you have asked about my inspiration for Community Supported Agriculture. Here is my suggested reading list of books about food and the food industry.  Some light and lyrical and some with stark depictions of slaughterhouse waste. Regardless, they will change the way you view your next meal.

1. Coming Home to Eat by Gary Nabhan.  This is where it began. When I heard Gary’s interview on NPR in 2001, I was immediately drawn to his philosophy of eating locally. Though I’ve still never supped on roadkill, Nabhan inspired me to harvest mesquite trees, eat tepiary beans, and pick cactus fruit.  And in keeping with local preference, he’s an Arizona guy.

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